About Us

The award-winning Exeter Radio Telescope at Caradon (XRT-C) project is an official national project of UK Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (UKSEDS), based and run primarily by students at the University of Exeter. We are building a 4.5m radio telescope for use as an education and research tool for students across the country. This is a student led project from the very beginning with students working together to plan, procure, construct and operate the final project. Once completed, our first large-scale project involves using the telescope to observe neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way with an aim to weigh our galaxy.

The Team

sam-morrell

Sam Morrell

Project Leader

Science Team Leader

damian-rumble

Damian Rumble

Project Co-Founder

Funding Team Leader

freya-aldred

Freya Aldred

Project Co-Founder

Engineering Team Leader

elisabeth-matthews

Elisabeth Matthews

Press & Publicity Team Leader

hannah-osborne

Hannah Osborne

Outreach Team Leader

ged-halliday

Ged Halliday

Procurement Team Leader

char-harrison

Char Harrison

Logistics Team Leader

Meet the Teams

A project as ambitious as XRT-C requires the combined effort of many people from many different disciplines. To ensure that we work as effectively as possible, we’ve broken off into specialised teams that focus on a specific part of the project. They are listed below, with a brief description of their responsibilities.

Engineering

Team Leader:

Freya Aldred

Team Members:

  • Dimitar Dimov
  • Danial Ahmad-Farid-Wee
  • Michael Jones
  • Abigail Frost
  • Richard Meadows

The engineering team has been focusing on three main areas; civil engineering, electrical engineering, and software. Each groups is focusing on the different technical aspects of the project from frame structure and foundations to electrical equipment and analysis.

Funding

Team Leader:

Damian Rumble

Team Members:

  • Charles Beaty

The finance teams main goal is to find backing for all aspects of the project from site fees, to procurement, and promotion and outreach activities – as well as looking to secure finances for our scientific endeavors after the telescope if built. We have applied for the Exeter Catalyst Public Engagement fund to aid in the run-up campaign and to help in the main cost of the dish. There is also the opportunity to look to industry for funding and sponsorship with different technology companies who specialize in the equipment needed for this project – a line that we are actively pursuing.

Press & Publicity

Team Leader:

Elisabeth Matthews

Team Members:

  • Laura Moore
  • Sam Morrell
  • Gemma Swansbury

Press and publicity is about making sure that all the exciting things going on in the project aren’t kept to ourselves, so others can see how we’ve gone about building our telescope. So we’ll be working with all the teams to keep the website and twitter up to date, as well as producing leaflets and posters to support outreach.

Outreach

Team Leader:

Hannah Osborne

Team Members:

  • Laura Moore
  • Sam Morrell
  • Elisabeth Matthews

This project is not just about the end result and the science we can eventually do but also about how we get there. Over the next year the outreach team will be working with each of our groups to present the run-up campaign taking a look behind-the-scenes of design, logistics and science of XRT-C.

Procurement

Team Leader:

Ged Halliday

Team Members:

  • Ben Sutlieff
  • Manraaj Matharoo
  • Char Harrison
  • Laurence Cullen
  • Stuart MacFarquhar

The procurement team have been focusing on the different equipment available in the amateur radio telescope market gaining insight into the potential costs involved. We have also been looking at private companies that specialize in the equipment that will be needed for the project and identifying potential sponsors.

Science

Team Leader:

Sam Morrell

Team Members:

  • Micheal Jones
  • Eve Nebbiolo
  • Ben Sutlieff
  • Manraaj Matharoo
  • Ian Isted

The Science Team is investigating what we can actually observe with XRT-C. We are currently focusing on the 21 cm hydrogen line. By observing this radiation we can probe the structure and motion of the Milky Way, and eventually estimate the mass of the galaxy! This involves a detailed understanding of both the science behind the observations and the technical aspects of measuring this radiation.